azkabanished:

mttyshealy:

LETS PLAY THE “TYPE THESE WORDS IN YOU R TAG BOX AND POST THE FIRST AUTOMATIC TAG THAT COMES UP” GAME: DIRTY WORD ADDITION OK

  • fuck, shit, dick, no, hell, sex, damn

image


“Sometimes you need to remind yourself that you were the one who carried you through the heartache. You are the one who sits with the cold body on the shower floor, and picks it up. You are the one who feeds it, who clothes it, who tucks it into bed, and you should be proud of that. Having the strength to take care of yourself when everyone around you is trying to bleed you dry, that is the strongest thing in the universe.” — Unknown (via taaqat)



oystergirlrhymes:

This semester I went to the White Privilege Conference in Madison, WI for my honors seminar about examining privilege. I made a poster about the behaviors of particular white female musicians who appropriate other cultures as a means of identity and sexualize/objectify WOC as a means of displaying sexual agency and social power. All under the guise of “empowerment”.


This is my take on the knowledge I found through seminar and readings, (esp. online articles) so in no way do I claim these ideas or concepts as my own.


shesmystifiedbythings:

bitteroreo:

youcantroamwithoutcaesar:

strawberry-bounce:

An average day’s worth of straight men in Amiyah Scott’s mentions. It’s one thing to dislike someone and to talk about them, but to go into their mentions?

They’re obsessed.

This is so terrifying

This isn’t about disliking someone, this is transmisogyny, transmisogynoir, transophobia. This is hatred, in the strongest form. All these folks in her mentions can burn in a fire, get hit by a bus, whatever they aren’t deemed worth living to me. This is how unsafe Black Transwomen are, they can’t even exist in the comfort of their own space at home, on the internet without threats of violence, this horrific, and disgusting.

and what makes me so mad, and what’s an attitude that really needs to be fucking addressed in our community, is that so many of these men are threatening violence against her because they believe she’s trying to trick them. like this is how the media fucks with our perceptions because trans women have always been set up as a ‘trap’ to threaten the sexuality of the hetero-hypermale. they are operating within the myth that a) black women’s bodies automatically belong to black men for the pursuit of their pleasure and b) trans women’s bodies are ‘false’ and ‘deceitful’ female bodies, and by merely existing they are a threat to male heterosexuality.

trans women’s bodies are women’s bodies. women’s bodies belong to themselves. the world does not revolve around your shriveled ego and the satisfaction of your tragic libido.


adamakara:


my sister hasn’t seen Avril Lavigne’s new video yet but she knew that she shaved off the side of her head and I was talking about how racist it (the video) was and how its offensive because of the way she presents japanese culture but she thought i was talking about her hair and she was like OH MY GOD CYNDI SHUT UP

posted 1 hour ago


GAY PRIDE CANCELLED BY THE MAYOR


I was on my way to class and I heard this boy scream THERE’S ONLY 2 GENDERS and this girl screamed back NO THERE’S NOT and I was like aye

posted 1 hour ago

killbenedictcumberbatch:

Laverne Cox and Lupita N’yongo literally have inspired so many trans women and black women and have done so much to encourage them and meanwhile they are less influential than an ugly oatmeal reptilian alien and a manchild who wrote a scene where two pretentious terminally ill teenagers make out at the Anne Frank Memorial


234 Female Students Went Missing in Nigeria, and the Media Has Barely Covered It

thepoliticalfreakshow:

The news: South Korea’s tragic ferry disaster has gripped international headlines for the past week as the world watched with bated breath to find out what happened. Though 159 bodies have been discovered by divers, another 143 still remain missing — and families and loved ones are hoping against hope that they are somehow still alive.

But on the other side of the world, 234 schoolgirls in Nigeria, ages 16 to 18, wereabducted two days before the South Korean incident. Armed men broke into a school in the northeastern city of Chibok, shot the guards and took the girls away while they were taking a physics exam. The attack has been linked to Boko Haram, a jihadist affiliate of al-Qaida.

So why haven’t we heard about it? Simply put, because the world has very different views on South Korea and Nigeria. One is among the richest countries in the world and a powerful Western ally with a high quality of life and strong international presence. The other is in Africa, where, you know, these things happen all the time — or so we’re led to believe.

"In Nigeria, the mass abduction of schoolgirls isn’t shocking," CNN claims. “No one knows where the missing girls are. And even more surprising, no one’s particularly shocked.”

Image Credit: Al-Jazeera

But that’s not true. Boko Haram, which is Hausa for “Western education is sinful,” is against the education of girls. Girls have been abducted in the past to serve as cooks or sex slaves — but a kidnapping of this size is unprecedented.

And despite what CNN might think, people aren’t simply giving up on the girls. Desperate family members and town residents have gone on the search, combing the Sambisa Forest, a known terrorist hangout, on motorcycles. The search parties have so far had some success, uncovering traces of the girls.

The government is not helping. According to the school, about 43 girls have already escaped their captors — no thanks to the authorities. ”None of these girls were rescued by the military; they managed to escape on their own from their abductors,” said schoolmaster Asabe Kwambura.

As recently as Monday, education authorities claimed that only 85 girls have gone missing, despite the families’ insistence that 234 were taken. The military even claimed at one point that they rescued all but eight girls — which they immediately retracted the following day.

Nigerian security officials insist they are in ”hot pursuit” of the abductors, but they’ve yet to find a single girl. ”It’s alarming that more than a week after these girls were abducted, there are not any concrete steps to get them back,” said Human Rights Watch’s Nigeria researcher Mausi Segun.

It’s a dangerous environment. Boko Haram has been on a rampage in recent months and on the same day as the girls’ abduction, the group claimed responsibility for a bombing in Abuja that killed 75. The terrorist group, which wants to establish an extremist Islamist state in northeastern Nigeria, has alreadykilled over 1,500 people this year.

But that does not mean we should look the other way when a tragedy like this takes place.

"The South Korean story has unfolded on camera, in a first-world country with every facility for news reporting. In contrast, the young Nigerians have vanished into the darkness of a dangerous world," Ann Perkins writes in the Guardian. "Nigeria is complex and messy and unfamiliar. It is easy to feel that what happens there is not real in the way that what happens on camera in South Korea is real."

The ugly truth is that when young lives are similarly at stake, we are more shocked when the danger takes place in a country that is considered stable and affluent — and less so in a country where violent insurgents are trying to take over.

But the media has a responsibility to report the truth rather than ignoring a story because it sounds familiar. It’s easy to become desensitized to stories coming out of a conflict-ridden region, but that doesn’t mean these human lives are worth any less.

Source: Eileen Shim for Policy Mic


I’ve been in a really good mood all week and I really think its because we’re learning about stuff that I’m really interested in

posted 2 hours ago

I wish he was my boyfriend
I wish he was my boyfriend
I’d love him till the very end
But instead he is just a friend
I wish he was my boyfriend


My skin has turned to porcelain, to ivory, to steel.

#got